Part VIII.   Conclusions (Appendices)
2.   Attempts to Change Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Attraction

Based upon all of the foregoing, we can now state the following six new or modified postulates concerning gravity:

1.   The reciprocal relationships of gravitational force emitted and received, of inertial resistances, of gravitational accelerations, orbits, orbital distances, orbital periods, and the like, of all opposing gravitating masses are mathematical consequences of their specific mass-ratios.

2.   The mass-ratio between any two opposing gravitating bodies (their relative forces received and their relative inertial resistances) is what determines their relative and reciprocal gravitational accelerations. The greater the mass-ratio between two gravitating bodies, the proportionally less will be the relative gravitational acceleration of the larger mass, and the proportionally greater will be the relative gravitational acceleration of the lesser mass.

3.   The gravitational acceleration motion of a pulled mass is proportional to the magnitude of the pulling mass, and such acceleration motion is inversely proportional to the magnitude of its own pulled mass (its inertial resistance).

4.   The gravitational action of a pulled mass, which motion is caused by the applied force of a pulling mass and the inertial resistance of the pulled mass, is equivalent to the gravitational reaction of the pulling mass, which motion is caused by the applied force of the pulled mass and the inertial resistance of the pulling mass, and vice-versa.

5.   The intensity of the attraction force emitted by a pulling body in all directions is proportional to the mass of the pulling body, diminished by the inverse square of the distance. The quantity of such intensity of force received by and acting upon the pulled body is proportional to the mass of the pulled body, diminished by the inverse square of the distance. The relative quantity of attractive force received by and acting upon each body is equivalent, and such quantity is proportional to the mass of the smaller body.

6.   When the ratio of the opposing masses changes, so does the relative quantity of the opposing forces received, the relative magnitudes of the opposing inertial resistances, and the relative quantity of such forces acting upon each pulled body.

These postulates are, of course, little more than the application of Newton’s laws of motion and gravitational attraction to the above scenarios. We shall call the first four postulates together, “The Law of Relative Gravitational Acceleration,” and we shall call all six postulates together, “The Relativity of Gravity.” The Relativity of Gravity applies to all opposing two-body mass systems, no matter how great or how small their relative mass-ratio. Other laws apply to multi-body mass systems.[1]

Let us now further apply these postulates to actual observations. An equivalent magnitude of force is applied to two unequal gravitating masses (the Earth and the Moon). The observed greater gravitational acceleration of the Moon’s smaller mass is inversely proportional to the lesser inertial resistance of the Moon’s lesser mass; and the observed lesser gravitational acceleration of the Earth’s greater mass is inversely proportional to the greater inertial resistance of the Earth’s greater mass.

Likewise, the observed greater gravitational action (great orbital motion) of the Moon’s smaller mass (its inertial resistance) is equivalent to the observed lesser reaction (tiny orbital motion) of the Earth’s greater mass (its inertial resistance). These observations exemplify nothing more than an application of Newton’s three laws of motion in combination with his law of gravitational attraction (Figures 9 and 10).

We have already discussed and compared the reciprocal and relative accelerations of various other sets of opposing masses that are confirmed by observation, i.e. the Sun-Earth mass system, and binary star systems. All of the above empirical examples consistently demonstrate that the ratio of opposing gravitational accelerations are inversely equivalent to the ratio of the opposing masses (gravitational forces and inertial resistances) involved. Thus, again: